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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
from lansing. not one worker from europe's biggest bank, hsbc, will far us a criminal charge after they were accuses of failing to guard against terrorists, tax cheat and drug cartels but agreed to pay a record $1.9 billion fine to settle the case. that probably won't hurt this bank at all. last quarter, they reported $2.5 billion in net profit. according to the treasury, the failure to police transactions allowed hundreds of millions of dollars in drug money from mexican cartels to flow into the united states. the feds report the bank broke finance laws when they did business with iran and libya and cuba and others. under their deem with the feds, the bank will pay the record fine, change some policies, but not one bank employee will ever face criminal prosecution. the prosecutors say department of justice officials wanted to bring criminal charges but decided not to not because of a lack evidence but because it would put the future of the largest banks at risk. think of that. not because they didn't have the goods. they were worried about the banking system. this says clearly it
. thanks. a stunning admission from one of the biggest banks in the world. the bigs at hsbc admit that they laundered money for drug cartels. they allowed forbidden transactions with countries including libya and iran. but nobody is going to prison. instead the bank executives are just saying we are sorry and paying a fine. the justice department announced agreement with hsbc the biggest bank in all of europe. as part of of the deal hsbc agrees to pay $1.9 billion in fines. a lot of money certainly. but for this bank it's the equivalent of roughly seven weeks of profits. in exchange, these are among the charges that will now disappear. laundering more than $880 million in drug money. and allowing $660 million in prohibited transactions from countries including libya, cuba, burma, sudan and iran. federal prosecutors say the bankers didn't just look the other way, they actually went a step further. one occasion hsbc instructed a bank in iran on how to format payment messages so that the transactions would not be blocked or rejected by the united states. >> shepard: in other words, t
.9 billion, that's how much global banking giant hsbc is paying the united states government to resolve accusations of money laundering for mexican drug cartels and terror-linked groups in saudi arabia. business correspondent christine romans joins us now from new york, and it's a serious allegation here. >> it really is and the group hsbc, the uk's largest bank wants to put this behind it, trying to settle the serious allegations, $1.92 billion will be what they will pay the u.s. government, there will be a press conference later today, the justice department, the manhattan d.a. and others to put this to rest. banks operating in the u.s. have an obligation to know their customer and abide by u.s. laws and u.s. sanctions against some pretty bad characters and hsbc apparently didn't do that. that's the allegation of the united states government, helping transfer money for drug cart cartels, for terrorist groups, for countries we're not supposed to be doing business with overall. these sanctions around libya, myanmar, syria and mexican cartels, this is what hsbc says, wants to put the who
, it was scandal unpunished. fines against hsbc, expensive mistakes at citi corp, jpmorgan chase cries out for real reform and real arrests of senior executives. where is the justice and where is the justice department? joining me now, dennis kelleher, president and ceo of better markets. dennis, is it fair to say that by in large, wall street and senior executives continue to get off almost scot free? >> the objective evidence proves that to be true. the real question is when is the law going to be applied to wall street like it is applied to the rest of main street and the rest of america. it is interesting, at the conference announcing the ubs settlement of $1.5 billion, the head of the criminal division said crime on wall street will not be tolerated. while he was indicting a japanese subsidiary of a swiss bank. and i know that geographically challenged they may think they're getting closer to wall street but wall street's much closer than either of those places. i can't wait for them to find it. >> eliot: i suppose some
more competitive. according to hsbc in 2000 mexican workers earned nearly five times the salary of their chinese peers. but by 2011, mexican workers were only about a third more expensive than chinese workers. when you project all these advantages into the next few years, mexico's economic future looks robust. the national intelligence council released an important report called "global trends 2030" one trend it looks at is how demographic changes will shape the world. countries with younger, more dynamic populations will grow faster. while the median age in mexico will be 30, 40, japan's median age will hit 52. america actually has an advantage here at 39. our median age will only be five years older than that of mexico's. trends don't ensure particular outcome, but it's clear that contrary to its global image, mexico's economy has momentum. it will be among the world's top ten economies by the end of this decade. smart reforms can build it further. the irony is that one possible impediment to mexico's growth could be the very country that is its biggest asset, the united state
is hsbc, apparently avoiding a criminal indictment but only because filing criminal charges could have destabilized the world's financial system. instead, the bank pay a record penalty. nearly $2 billion this that settlement, and as rick was just mentioning, the bank is facing a slew of accusations including that it transferred funds to mexican drug cartels and also transferred funds to nations like iran, evading international sanctions. charlie gasparino has more from the fox business network. charlie, is this unique only to hsbc, or is in the first domino to fall here? >> well, i mean, there may be other banks, but it follows a pattern that the justice department has used since arthur anderson following the enron scandal. they didn't want to put any more big companies out of business, so they go into these deferred prosecution agreements, today hit the bank with a big fine and then today kind of move on. what's kind of like -- what's not good about this is that if you think about it, shareholders are suffering when you had probably individual employees who committed possible crimes h
that the hsbc bank intentionally allowed prohibited transactions with iran, libya, sudan, and berm a, this is the u.s. department of justice that actually filed these felony criminal charges against the bank. it was widely expected precursor to a deferred prosecution agreement under which the bank would pay $1.9 billion to resolve money laundering charges. some background on a few of these countries designated state sponsors terrorism. >> this morning the number one story days this live action that is playing out in lansing, michigan. you see union supporters chanting an in the say the capitol, so reminiscent of what we saw in wisconsin as they battled the unions in their state. michigan has long been a very solid baston of union support and companies with all the union automakers having a presence there. this is a little bit of the sentiment being expressed by the union supporters on the ground there. >> how can you protect us was a union and protect our collective bargaining rights. it will erode what we worked very hard to achieve if it goes through. >> i'm all for right to work.
to pursue criminal charges against hsbc. the bank admits laundering money from iran, libya and myanmar. chuck grassley calls the lack of charges a declaration that "crime does pay." the justice department did not comment but defends its nearly $2 billion settlement with the bank. >>> two massachusetts costco workers are splitting a $50 million powerball prize. rosa deleon buys two tickets every day and shares them with her co-worker reginald. on wednesday the tickets finally paid off. the two will each get $11 million after taxes. congratulations to them. very lucky. >>> there is a machine that could one day be used to make homemade guns, not only that, it could make plastic guns that a metal detector won't find. you can believe some people are worried about it. here is joe johns with more. >> reporter: in the this northern virginia gun store you can buy all sorts of weapons but what if you could make weapons in your own home using a three-dimensional printer. sounds like science fiction but to some it's not far-fetched. >> primarily 3-d printers are used to manufacture parts for antiq
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)